Tea Time at Reverie: Teasenz’s Ali Shan Milky Oolong Tea

Oolongs are wonderfully versatile when it comes to flavor. They can be floral, vegetal, fruity, honeyed – or, in this case, milky. It sounds like a weird combination, but it’s actually not so far-fetched. Find out why in my review of Teasenz’s Ali Shan Milky Oolong at A Bibliophile’s Reverie.

Also, I’ll be “off the grid” for the Thanksgiving holiday. I should be back on social media either Sunday or Monday, and my next blog post will go live on Monday as well. Until then, have a good rest of your week and a Happy Thanksgiving!

A Bibliophile's Reverie

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Awwww, we’re down to our final Teasenz sample! I’ve really enjoyed trying this Chinese vendor’s selections over the past year. Each has been of superb quality, to the point that I know I’ll be a customer in the future. 😉

So, what have I saved for last from Teasenz? Ali Shan Milky Oolong. (Yes, the name does sound strange if you’ve never heard of it before.) This particular kind of tea is grown only in Taiwan, in the country’s Ali Shan Mountain region. According to Teasenz, the area’s soil conditions and the production methods used for these leaves bring out a unique milk flavor and creaminess. Read on to find out how these qualities manifest once Ali Shan Milky Oolong is brewed.

The Basics

Teasenz Ali Shan Milky Oolong 1 Photo courtesy of Teasenz

Teasenz’s Description:Intense creamy taste with floral undertone. A one-of-a-kind tea from Taiwan with a fantastically creamy flavor resulting from its unique roasting process. Our Ali Shan…

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Tea Time at Reverie: Tea From Taiwan’s GABA Oolong Tea

Being a tea reviewer has allowed me to sample all kinds of teas that I had never heard of before. GABA tea is the latest example – and I bet this is a new one for many other tea drinkers, too. Find out what makes this oolong from Tea From Taiwan so unique in my latest post at A Bibliophile’s Reverie.

A Bibliophile's Reverie

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Ever heard of GABA Oolong Tea before? Most likely you haven’t. Neither had I, until Tea From Taiwan sent me a sample for review. Apparently it’s popular in Japan and Taiwan, but it hasn’t caught on here in the United States yet. Hmmmmmm. I wonder why?

First produced in Japan in 1987, GABA tea is made from high-grade whole leaves (either green or oolong) that are naturally rich in glutamic acid. The leaves undergo a unique process where they’re exposed to nitrogen gas under controlled conditions to release gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an amino acid that occurs naturally in the human body’s nervous system and retinae. As for possible health benefits, scientific studies have shown that GABA tea may help with relieving anxiety and stress, increasing mental alertness, and lowering high blood pressure.

Interesting, don’t you think? If you’d like to learn more about GABA Oolong Tea, check out Tea From Taiwan’s…

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Tea Time at Reverie: Tea From Taiwan’s Zhong Shu Hu Oolong Tea

Another tea review is up at A Bibliophile’s Reverie! This time I try Zhong Shu Hu Oolong from Tea From Taiwan. If you’re a fan of light or milky (Alishan) oolongs, this one might be of interest to you.

A Bibliophile's Reverie

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Forgive me if I’ve said it before, but the variety of oolong teas never ceases to amaze me. Vegetal, floral, fruity, roasted – each one has been as unique as a person’s fingerprint. Today we have another oolong offering for you: Zhong Shu Hu Oolong, courtesy of Tea From Taiwan. This particular tea is grown in the Ali Mountain region (Alishan), which is one of Taiwan’s most famous tea-producing regions. Most oolongs from this part of the world are known for their unique “milky” presence in both aroma and taste. However, Tea From Taiwan describes Zhong Shu Hu as sweet and complex. Maybe it’s a little bit of all three qualities? Let’s find out.

The Basics

Zhong Shu Hu Tea From Taiwan Photo courtesy of Tea From Taiwan

Tea From Taiwan’s Description:“Zhong Shu Hu oolong tea has a sweet taste and refined aroma. Each brewing brings out new flavours and taste sensations. This…

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