Tea Time at Reverie: Golden Tips’ Moonlight Darjeeling Black Tea

Finally had a chance to try a Darjeeling black tea for Tea Time at Reverie! This review goes into a little more detail about how Darjeelings differ from Assams, which more tea drinkers are familiar with. The focus, however, is on Moonlight Darjeeling from Golden Tips. If you’re looking for something less robust and more refined than the usual black tea, this review might pique your interest. 😉

A Bibliophile's Reverie

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When the package of samples from Golden Tips Tea first arrived, I was thrilled to find some Darjeeling teas inside. Though Darjeelings aren’t as well-known as Assam teas, they’re considered some of the finest in the world. In fact, Darjeeling black tea is nicknamed the “Champagne of Teas” because of its distinct aroma and flavor palate. I’ve had a few Darjeelings, and I have to agree – they’re smoother than Assams, more floral and fruity than Ceylons, and wonderfully delicious.

Which leads me to today’s Tea Time. Golden Tips’ Moonlight Darjeeling is a blend of black teas from various plantations across India’s Darjeeling region. All of the leaves were picked during “first flush” (March / April 2015) and are categorized as “Moonlight” due to their superior quality and aroma. In other words, this is one fine black tea blend. Who would like to try a cup with me? 🙂

The…

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Tea Time at Reverie: Inspired By Jane’s Donwell Abbey Black Tea

What happens when you combine black tea with a wine often used in Italian cooking? You get Inspired By Jane’s Donwell Abbey, a black tea with cinnamon and marsala wine. It’s not a combination you see much from your typical tea vendor – and as I discovered, it was actually quite delicious. Read my review of Donwell Abbey at A Bibliophile’s Reverie to learn more.

And yes, Donwell Abbey is another tea inspired by one of Jane Austen’s novels. 😉

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“It was a sweet view—sweet to the eye and the mind. English verdure, English culture, English comfort, seen under a sun bright, without being oppressive.”
– Jane Austen, “Emma”

I confess that Emma is one of the few Jane Austen novels I haven’t read. But when Inspired By Jane asked which tea samples I’d like to try, I was immediately intrigued by Donwell Abbey. Named after the the estate owned by Emma’s neighbor (and future love interest) George Knightley, this black tea boasts a unusual yet appealing combination of cinnamon and marsala wine flavors.

Hmmmmm. I do like the sweet, tangy taste of marsala wine sauces in chicken marsala and chicken saltimbocca. So, how will it blend with cinnamon and black tea? Let’s brew some and find out, shall we?

The Basics

Donwell Abbey canInspired By Jane’s Description:“Almost a ‘gentleman’s tea,’ but everyone will love this rich, full-bodied black tea…

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Tea Time at Reverie: Sweet Jane Bennet from Bingley’s Teas

It’s our last Tea Time of 2015! Today’s is also an appropriate choice for the holiday season, a black-and-green tea blend named after the kind yet reserved oldest daughter of the Bennet family from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. Read more about Sweet Jane Bennet from Bingley’s Teas at A Bibliophile’s Reverie!

A Bibliophile's Reverie

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“Oh! You are a great deal too apt, you know, to like people in general. You never see a fault in anybody. All the world are good and agreeable in your eyes. I never heard you speak ill of a human being in your life.”
Elizabeth Bennet to Jane Bennet, in Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice”

No one can deny that Jane Bennet is a sweetheart. The eldest sister of the beloved Bennet family from Pride and Prejudice, she’s kind, soft-spoken, and patient, an optimist who sees the best in people. Maybe it’s no surprise that Jane caught Charles Bingley’s eye – she’s an angel, in both demeanor and physical beauty.

What would an angelic character’s tea taste like, then? If you ask Bingley’s Teas, their answer would most likely be Sweet Jane Bennet from their Jane Austen Tea Series. This blend of black and green tea combines…

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Time Flies!: November 2015

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Welcome to the latest edition of Time Flies! It’s my version of a monthly update, where I recap the past month’s accomplishments and articles, share news and random things from my offline life, and hint at what may be coming in the month ahead.

Huh? What do you mean, tomorrow’s the first day of December?! I’m not ready to think about 2016 yet!!

Buddy the Elf

It’s insane how quickly this year has sped by. November in itself was a blur. I was hoping things would quiet down after a nutty October. Nope. Life offline turned into another kind of crazy altogether. So I’ve craved more time than usual to relax and meditate, and I know I’ll still need it now that the holiday season is underway.

Btw, I hope all my fellow Americans (and anyone else who celebrates the holiday) had a wonderful Thanksgiving! I’d traveled out to state to spend it with relatives, hence my absence from the blog and social media for the past few days.

Let me give you a chance to catch up on the past month’s posts now:
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Tea Time at Reverie: Golden Tips Tea’s Assam Enigma Black Tea

Today’s tea review at A Bibliophile’s Reverie covers a surprising Assam black tea from Golden Tips. I say “surprising” because although it’s strong and assertive like other black teas from that region of India, its flavor profile is quite unique. Read on to learn more about Assam Enigma.

A Bibliophile's Reverie

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Time for another new vendor! Golden Tips Tea was kind enough to send a generous package of samples for future Tea Times. This family business in India sells single-origin, unflavored teas from some of the country’s finest tea regions. Darjeeling, Assam, Nilgiri, and even the neighboring country of Nepal are represented. I’m excited to finally dive into their offerings, and I hope you are, too!

And with the fall days growing shorter and chillier, it’s the ideal time to break out a new black tea. Assam Enigma catches my eye first from the Golden Tips stash. This blend of summer-picked black tea leaves is said to carry the strong, malty flavors that Assam teas are famous for, with a few surprises. (Plus, doesn’t the word “enigma” in the name entice you into trying it?) So, let’s get brewing.

The Basics

Photo courtesy of Golden Tips Tea Photo courtesy of Golden Tips Tea

Golden Tips’ Description:“An…

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5 on the 5th: Five Delicious Black Teas to Try This Fall

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On the fifth day of each month, 5 on the 5th shares five of something that I like or recommend to readers. Whether it’s five items that share a common theme, or five reasons why I like the topic at hand, this monthly meme gives us an opportunity to talk about other subjects that aren’t normally discussed here at the blog. 

Ah, fall. I’m not the biggest fan of this season, but I love many foods that are associated with it: soup, apple cider, pumpkin pie… and black tea! Well, yes, I do drink black tea year-round. But I know other people take a break from it during the warmer months and then come back to it as the nights get cooler and the leaves start to fall. So, what better way to kick off autumn than trying some new black teas? Here are five I highly recommend, along with links in case you feel tempted. 😉
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Time Flies!: August 2015

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Welcome to the latest edition of Time Flies! It’s my version of a monthly update, where I recap the past month’s accomplishments and articles, share news and random things from my offline life, and hint at what may be coming in the month ahead.

Well, that was a crazier month than I’d expected. Not a bad kind of crazy, but attending the Writer’s Digest Conference and writing a trio of articles to cover the event for DIY MFA on top of everything I normally do in a month’s time brought the phrase “insanely busy” to a higher level.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m so, SO grateful for going to WDC this year, and for everything I learned and experienced while I was there. I just happened to load too much on my plate once again. It’s a bad habit I need to learn to kick… someday. 😉

But I got through it. I managed to stay on top of my priorities, though it did mean postponing other bloggish things (tea reviews, the blogoversary giveaway, an upcoming guest post, etc.) I’d been meaning to work on.  So, I still have some catching up to do, but that’s OK. It means that September should be a fun month here! Make sure you keep an eye out on your inbox or check back here during the month so you don’t miss out on anything.

In the meantime, here’s your chance to catch up on August’s posts:

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Tea Time at Reverie: Miss Elizabeth Black Tea from Bingley’s Teas

Squeezing in a tea review before the month is over. If you’re a fan of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice or of black teas that lean on the fruity or sweet side, Miss Elizabeth Black Tea from Bingley’s Teas might appeal to your tastebuds. Read more about it now at A Bibliophile’s Reverie!

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“There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well.  The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and everyday confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of either merit or sense.”
– Elizabeth Bennet, Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice”

Out of all of Jane Austen’s heroines, Elizabeth Bennet from Pride and Prejudice has resonated most with readers over the years. She’s intelligent, witty, and virtuous, she converses easily with others and never resorts to the (*ahem*) embarrassing behaviors of other women in her family, especially her mother and her youngest sister Lydia. Lizzie, however, is fond of her sharp tongue and her ability to read people. That pride triggers her character arc – and a good deal of Pride and Prejudice

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Tea Time at Reverie: Elinor’s Heart Black Tea from Bingley’s Teas

English Breakfast fans, here’s a black tea with a literary slant that you might like! Elinor’s Heart from Bingley’s Teas combines bright Ceylon with jammy Kenyan leaves for a well-rounded cup that celebrates the more level-headed and rational Dashwood sister from Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility. Learn more about Elinor’s Heart – and why I prefer it steeped on the longer end of its brew range – at A Bibliophile’s Reverie!

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“I have seen a great deal of him, have studied his sentiments and heard his opinion on subjects of literature and taste; and, upon the whole, I venture to pronounce that his mind is well-informed, his enjoyment of books exceedingly great, his imagination lively, his observation just and correct, and his taste delicate and pure.… At present, I know him so well, that I think him really handsome; or, at least, almost so.”
Elinor Dashwood, Jane Austen’s “Sense and Sensibility”

If Marianne Dashwood represents the “sensibility” of Sense and Sensibility, her older sister Elinor would be the “sense.” She’s practical, well-mannered, and rational, making her the perfect – if not only – choice as her mother’s counselor and the Dashwoods’ accountant. Even when Elinor falls in love with Edward Ferrars, her logic overrules her heart, and she places her responsibilities for her family over her desire for marriage…

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Tea Time at Reverie: Sanctuary T’s Geisha Beauty

Sanctuary T’s Geisha Beauty promises a burst of peach against a backdrop of black and green teas. Do the aroma and the flavor profile live up to this promise? Find out at my newest tea review at A Bibliophile’s Reverie.

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After falling in love with fruity black/green tea blends last year, I’ve been on the lookout for similar teas that combine different types of leaves with a floral or fruity pizzazz. Our previous Sanctuary T sample, Spring Harvest, was a lovely example of green and white teas married with tropical flavors. Now it’s time for another choice from Sanctuary T: Geisha Beauty, a best-selling blend of black and green teas with a dash of peach flavoring. Just how peachy is this infusion? Keep reading to find out.

The Basics

Geisha_Beauty_Loose Photo courtesy of Sanctuary T

Sanctuary T’s Description:“Geishas have traditionally been associated with beauty, subtlety, and sophistication, and those three ingredients are the inspiration behind this refined blend. We’ve combined black tea, green tea, sunflower leaves, rose petals, and other natural flavors to create a rich tea with strong undertones of peach. Try it iced or paired with…

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