Tea Time at Reverie: Mr. Darcy’s Pride Oolong from Bingley’s Teas

Which male characters come to mind when you think of Jane Austen’s novels? How about Mr. Darcy from Pride and Prejudice? Then maybe you’d like to try Mr. Darcy’s Pride, a unique oolong tea offered by Bingley’s Teas. Check out this bold-scented tea that grows more approachable with each brew, at my newest Tea Time at A Bibliophile’s Reverie!

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“In vain I have struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.”
Mr. Darcy in a letter to Elizabeth Bennet, Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice”

Ah, Fitzwilliam Darcy. He may be handsome and wealthy, but at the beginning of Pride and Prejudice his cold, aloof behavior is not the least bit becoming. No wonder Elizabeth Bennet feels slighted by his remarks when they first meet, and later turns down his marriage proposal. His failures and Elizabeth’s pointed criticisms eventually influence Mr. Darcy to see the error in his ways; and by the end of the novel, even Elizabeth sees that he has changed for the better.

Knowing Mr. Darcy’s complexity, I was curious to see how Bingley’s Teas would reflect his character with a tea. Their choice? Mr. Darcy’s Pride, a distinctive…

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Tea Time at Reverie: Longbourn Wedding Tea from Bingley’s Teas

Happy first day of spring, everyone! How about we celebrate the start of a beautiful season with a tea of promise – a wedding tea? In fact, Longbourn Wedding might be my new favorite from Bingley’s Teas. Check out today’s Tea Time at A Bibliophile’s Reverie to find out why this sparkling white tea is so delicious.

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“It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”
Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice”

Ah, marriage. It’s the revolving point of Pride and Prejudice. Many of the unmarried characters in the story, including men like Mr. Darcy, feel some kind of social pressure to make that ultimate commitment. Plus, everyone in the Bennet family has different reasons behind their marriage choices, from lust and convenience (Mr. and Mrs. Bennet) to love (Jane Bennet) and mutual trust (Elizabeth Bennet). But in the end, Lizzie and Jane become engaged to their ideal partners – which means it’s time for not one wedding, but two!

So, how do we celebrate such a special event here at Tea Time? With tea, of course! This brings us to our next sample from Bingley’s Teas. Named after the Bennet family’s estate,

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Tea Time at Reverie: Sweet Jane Bennet from Bingley’s Teas

It’s our last Tea Time of 2015! Today’s is also an appropriate choice for the holiday season, a black-and-green tea blend named after the kind yet reserved oldest daughter of the Bennet family from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. Read more about Sweet Jane Bennet from Bingley’s Teas at A Bibliophile’s Reverie!

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“Oh! You are a great deal too apt, you know, to like people in general. You never see a fault in anybody. All the world are good and agreeable in your eyes. I never heard you speak ill of a human being in your life.”
Elizabeth Bennet to Jane Bennet, in Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice”

No one can deny that Jane Bennet is a sweetheart. The eldest sister of the beloved Bennet family from Pride and Prejudice, she’s kind, soft-spoken, and patient, an optimist who sees the best in people. Maybe it’s no surprise that Jane caught Charles Bingley’s eye – she’s an angel, in both demeanor and physical beauty.

What would an angelic character’s tea taste like, then? If you ask Bingley’s Teas, their answer would most likely be Sweet Jane Bennet from their Jane Austen Tea Series. This blend of black and green tea combines…

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Time Flies!: August 2015

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Welcome to the latest edition of Time Flies! It’s my version of a monthly update, where I recap the past month’s accomplishments and articles, share news and random things from my offline life, and hint at what may be coming in the month ahead.

Well, that was a crazier month than I’d expected. Not a bad kind of crazy, but attending the Writer’s Digest Conference and writing a trio of articles to cover the event for DIY MFA on top of everything I normally do in a month’s time brought the phrase “insanely busy” to a higher level.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m so, SO grateful for going to WDC this year, and for everything I learned and experienced while I was there. I just happened to load too much on my plate once again. It’s a bad habit I need to learn to kick… someday. 😉

But I got through it. I managed to stay on top of my priorities, though it did mean postponing other bloggish things (tea reviews, the blogoversary giveaway, an upcoming guest post, etc.) I’d been meaning to work on.  So, I still have some catching up to do, but that’s OK. It means that September should be a fun month here! Make sure you keep an eye out on your inbox or check back here during the month so you don’t miss out on anything.

In the meantime, here’s your chance to catch up on August’s posts:

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Tea Time at Reverie: Miss Elizabeth Black Tea from Bingley’s Teas

Squeezing in a tea review before the month is over. If you’re a fan of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice or of black teas that lean on the fruity or sweet side, Miss Elizabeth Black Tea from Bingley’s Teas might appeal to your tastebuds. Read more about it now at A Bibliophile’s Reverie!

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“There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well.  The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and everyday confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of either merit or sense.”
– Elizabeth Bennet, Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice”

Out of all of Jane Austen’s heroines, Elizabeth Bennet from Pride and Prejudice has resonated most with readers over the years. She’s intelligent, witty, and virtuous, she converses easily with others and never resorts to the (*ahem*) embarrassing behaviors of other women in her family, especially her mother and her youngest sister Lydia. Lizzie, however, is fond of her sharp tongue and her ability to read people. That pride triggers her character arc – and a good deal of Pride and Prejudice

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Tea Time at Reverie: Elinor’s Heart Black Tea from Bingley’s Teas

English Breakfast fans, here’s a black tea with a literary slant that you might like! Elinor’s Heart from Bingley’s Teas combines bright Ceylon with jammy Kenyan leaves for a well-rounded cup that celebrates the more level-headed and rational Dashwood sister from Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility. Learn more about Elinor’s Heart – and why I prefer it steeped on the longer end of its brew range – at A Bibliophile’s Reverie!

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“I have seen a great deal of him, have studied his sentiments and heard his opinion on subjects of literature and taste; and, upon the whole, I venture to pronounce that his mind is well-informed, his enjoyment of books exceedingly great, his imagination lively, his observation just and correct, and his taste delicate and pure.… At present, I know him so well, that I think him really handsome; or, at least, almost so.”
Elinor Dashwood, Jane Austen’s “Sense and Sensibility”

If Marianne Dashwood represents the “sensibility” of Sense and Sensibility, her older sister Elinor would be the “sense.” She’s practical, well-mannered, and rational, making her the perfect – if not only – choice as her mother’s counselor and the Dashwoods’ accountant. Even when Elinor falls in love with Edward Ferrars, her logic overrules her heart, and she places her responsibilities for her family over her desire for marriage…

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Time Flies!: March 2015

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Welcome to the latest edition of Time Flies! It’s my version of a monthly update, where I recap the past month’s accomplishments and articles, share news and random things from my offline life, and hint at what may be coming in the month ahead.

Happy Spring, everyone! 😀 Even though it’s been an abnormally cold March here in Massachusetts, I feel lighter in heart knowing that my favorite season has finally arrived. Pretty soon, leaves will bud on the trees, flowers will bloom, and temperatures will be just warm enough so I can resume my outdoor walks. Lush, green, colorful, fresh… *sighs with contentment*

Spring means more to me than nature’s re-awakening after its winter slumber, though. It also marks an anniversary for me, one of a spiritual and emotional turnaround after a bout of situational depression. My poem “Eve of Spring” talks about this a little bit. If you’re interested, you can read the poem here or here.

What else have I been up to this past month? Check out the recaps below:

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Tea Time at Reverie: Lydia Had More Fun Rooibos Tea from Bingley’s Teas

Looking for a more “dressed up” rooibos tisane? Lydia Had More Fun from Bingley’s Teas might be the choice for you then. It mixes red rooibos with freshly shaved coconut for a fun and indulgent herbal tea. Find out more about Lydia Had More Fun – and which Jane Austen character inspired this “dessert in a cup” – at my new tea review at A Bibliophile’s Reverie!

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“‘You need not send them word at Longbourn of my going, if you do not like it, for it will make the surprise the greater when I write to them and sign my name Lydia Wickham. What a good joke it will be! I can hardly write for laughing.’”
– Lydia Bennet, Jane Austen’s Pride And Prejudice

Ah, Lydia Bennet. The youngest daughter of Pride and Prejudice’s central family, she adores fine clothes, fancy parties, and men in uniform. It’s no surprise that she’s one of literature’s most famous debutantes – or that she runs off with that shifty Mr. Wickham. Now, if there was a perfect tea match for Lydia’s naivety and self-indulgence, what would it be? The answer comes courtesy of Bingley’s Teas and their extensive Jane Austen Tea Series. Decaf seekers and dessert-tisane lovers, meet Lydia Had More Fun Rooibos Tea.

The Basics

Lydia Had More Fun 1 Photo courtesy…

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Time Flies: December 2014 Edition

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Looking for this month’s Freelance Article Round-Up? It’s here – under a new name!

The Freelance Article Round-Up series will now be known as Time Flies!, a monthly wrap-up article that… well, does exactly what the Freelance Article Round-Ups had been doing. Originally, the round-ups were designed to share my columnist projects at A Bibliophile’s Reverie, Grub Street, and DIY MFA. Then I started including other happenings related to writing, this blog, and life in general. And so the round-ups evolved into something more – and a couple weeks ago, I realized the title didn’t fit the purpose anymore. What do you think of the new name? And the new logo? 🙂

Let’s jump right in with this month’s updates: Continue reading

Tea Time at Reverie: Compassion For Mrs. Bennet’s Nerves Herbal Tea from Bingley’s Teas

Herbal teas are well-known for their medicinal, soothing qualities. Compassion For Mrs. Bennet’s Nerves, part of the Jane Austen Tea Series by Bingley’s Teas, combines sweet, mellow chamomile with stimulating peppermint and other ingredients to offer a panacea to the excitable, melodramatic matriarch of Pride And Prejudice‘s Bennet family. The question is, does it do the trick? Find out by reading my review now at A Bibliophile’s Reverie!

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“Oh Mr Bennet! How can you tease me so? Have you no compassion for my poor nerves?” – Mrs. Bennet, Jane Austen’s Pride And Prejudice

With each Tea Time, I like to pick a tea that’s noticeably different from the previous review. For example, after a lusciously bold and complex black tea last time, I decided to try an herbal blend next. I also was eager to revisit Bingley’s Tea’s Jane Austen Tea Series , since I fell in love with the first tea I sampled from them. So, out came my sample of Compassion For Mrs. Bennet’s Nerves. This blend of floral, mint, and fruit ingredients is inspired by the matriarch of the Bennet family in Jane Austen’s Pride And Prejudice. Frequently nervous and easy to upset, Mrs. Bennet (whose sole desire in life seems to be marrying off her daughters) would no doubt benefit from a…

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